Egyptian gas must start Natural Gas flow to Lebanon in the coming 3 months, says U.S. energy envoy

Egyptian gas must start Natural Gas flow to Lebanon in the coming 3 months, says U.S. energy envoy

Summary:

  • As said by Amos Hochstein, natural gas from Egypt might begin to flow to Lebanon in 2 or 3 months, expectantly, “far before” the country’s elections next year, 2022.
  • In September, the governments of four nations agreed to pipe gas from Egypt through Jordan and Syria to Lebanon, easing the country’s power problem.
  • “Week by week, I’m more optimistic that we’ll be able to get the gas flowing and the energy integrated in the next two or three months,” Hochstein told reporters.

Energy flow to Lebanon before country’s elections

Natural gas from Egypt might reach Lebanon in two or three months, hopefully, “far before” the country’s 2022 elections. Senior advisor for global energy security at the US State Department, Amos Hochstein, is optimistic about the event.

In September, the governments of four nations agreed to pipe gas from Egypt through Jordan and Syria to Lebanon, easing the country’s power problem.

According to Reuters, Egypt’s Petroleum Minister Tarek El-Molla stated at the time that the proposal, which is endorsed by the US, would be implemented at the “earliest opportunity.”

Although there is still work to be done before the pipeline is ready, Hochstein is optimistic that the idea, as well as an attempt to connect Jordan and Lebanon’s electrical systems, will succeed.

When asked if this may happen before Lebanon’s elections in March 2022, he responded that he is “very positive.” I expect at the very least the gas transaction to go through, and that gas will be flowing much before then.”

Lebanon’s Energy Status

Even if both measures — importing gas from Egypt and connecting to Jordan’s power grid — assist to settle Lebanon’s electrical situation, Hochstein says they are not the “final solution.”

“Those two initiatives only provide you with a few hours of power per day.” “We need to go to 24 hours a day, seven days a week with redundancy,” he continued.

According to the World Bank, Lebanon is experiencing one of the worst economic crises in contemporary history. Power outages happen daily, including one in October that lasted 24 hours.

The unexpected rolling blackouts in Lebanon, according to Hochstein, are an indication that the country’s hope, or “light at the end of the tunnel,” is fading.

He said, “We need to pay attention to that flickering light and make sure it doesn’t go out.”

Financial assistance will be useless if the country has a reliable energy source that allows people to live with some assurance, according to Hochstein. Farmers need fuel to get their products to market and small companies need energy for their computers, he said.

“This concept that Lebanon always teeters but never collapses,” he continued, “isn’t necessarily true.” “We must remain cautious and do everything possible.”

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